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Privacy Newsletter - August 18th 2020

  • by Arlo Gilbert
  • last updated August 18, 2020
Privacy Newsletter - August 18th 2020

Welcome to the latest edition of the Privacy Insider Newsletter. Each week, we send you the latest and smartest news in the world of data privacy.

Here are the top stories from last week you might have missed:

  1. California's attorney general approved the final regulations of the California Consumer Privacy Act. The attorney general's announcement is the last step in the multi-year process of enacting the CCPA. The final regulations included some modifications of the existing rules, including withdrawing a handful of provisions and rewording others. Link
  2. Oracle and Salesforce are being prosecuted in a GDPR class-action lawsuit in the UK and the Netherlands over cookie tracking consent. The two companies have become significant players in the ad tech space through acquisitions. The suits argue that their third-party tracking cookies are being used to misuse Europeans' data without proper consent. Link
  3. Osano released an infographic showing the link between a company's privacy practices and their likelihood to experience a data breach. The infographic follows up on a white paper we released after discovering this relationship. Good data privacy practices help cause good security outcomes! Link
  4. Clearview AI hired a prominent First Amendment attorney to represent the company in several upcoming court cases. After scraping billions of photos from social media platforms, the controversial company faces lawsuits in New York, Virginia, Illinois, and Vermont. Link
  5. The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled police can force suspects to provide their phone passwords. Courts are split over whether this violates the Fifth Amendment, which protects against self-incriminating testimony. The New Jersey court's ruling hinged on the distinction between self-incriminating testimony and the production of incriminating information, which the Constitution does not explicitly protect. Link
  6. Google admitted that their Home speakers have been recording users even when devices had not been activated. Devices are programmed not to record unless they hear "wake words." A recent software update caused the bug, which has since been patched. Link

About The Author · Arlo Gilbert

Arlo Gilbert is the CEO & co-founder of Osano. An Austin, Texas native, he has been building software companies for more than 20 years in categories including telecom, payments, procurement, and compliance. In 2005 Arlo invented voice commerce, he has testified before congress on technology issues, and is a frequent speaker on data privacy rights.